Difference between revisions of "Otto Culmbacher"

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Parody of classical conductors in a 1914 short comedy piece called "Those Symphony Concert Programs" by Lawton MacKall.
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[[Image:Culmbacher_Otto_CenturyMagazine_1914.png‎|right]]Parody of classical conductors in a 1914 short comedy piece called "Those Symphony Concert Programs" by Lawton MacKall.
  
 
He conducts the generically named ''Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra'' in [[Ptior Kovik-Bordunov]]'s "Gastronomic Symphony," his own "Larghetto," and the Aria from the opera ''II Campanile'' by [[Gondola]].  
 
He conducts the generically named ''Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra'' in [[Ptior Kovik-Bordunov]]'s "Gastronomic Symphony," his own "Larghetto," and the Aria from the opera ''II Campanile'' by [[Gondola]].  

Revision as of 09:41, 16 January 2014

Culmbacher Otto CenturyMagazine 1914.png

Parody of classical conductors in a 1914 short comedy piece called "Those Symphony Concert Programs" by Lawton MacKall.

He conducts the generically named Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra in Ptior Kovik-Bordunov's "Gastronomic Symphony," his own "Larghetto," and the Aria from the opera II Campanile by Gondola.

II. Larghetto. This etude is by the conduc- tor. (He thought this would be a good place to work it in, the orchestra and audience being powerless to restrain him.)

Herr Otto Fedor Ivan Culmbacher was born of noble parents in Hofbrau, Silesia. He was discovered and imported to America by the brilliant patronesses of the Metropolitan Symphony Society.

A larghetto is a little largo — one without a handel. A composer writes a larghetto when he feels something like writing a largo but isn't, on the whole, quite up to it.

External Links

See also: [1]